Death, Dying and Dark Tourism in Contemporary Society: A Theoretical and Empirical AnalysisReport as inadecuate






Author: Philip R Stone

Source: https://core.ac.uk/

Despite increasing academic and media attention paid to dark tourism – the act of travel to sites of death, disaster and the seemingly macabre – understanding of the concept remains limited, particularly from a consumption perspective. That is, the literature focuses primarily on the supply of dark tourism. Less attention, however, has been paid to the consumption of ‘dark’ touristic experiences and the mediation of such experiences in relation to modern-day mortality. This thesis seeks to address this gap in the literature. Drawing upon thanatological discourse – that is, the analysis of society’s perceptions of and reactions to death and dying – the research objective is to explore the potential of dark tourism as a means of contemplating mortality in (Western) societies. In so doing, the thesis appraises dark tourism consumption within society, especially within a context of contemporary perspectives of death a...


Teaser



Death, Dying and Dark Tourism in Contemporary Society: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis by Philip R.Stone A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment for the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Central Lancashire October 2010 Student Declaration I declare that while registered as a candidate for the research degree, I have not been a registered candidate or enrolled student for another award of the University or other academic or professional institution I declare that no material contained in the thesis has been used in any other submission for an academic award and is solely my own work Signature of Candidate: Philip R.Stone Type of Award: PhD School: School of Sport, Tourism & The Outdoors Abstract Despite increasing academic and media attention paid to dark tourism – the act of travel to sites of death, disaster and the seemingly macabre – understanding of the concept remains limited, particularly from a consumption perspective.
That is, the literature focuses primarily on the supply of dark tourism.
Less attention, however, has been paid to the consumption of ‗dark‘ touristic experiences and the mediation of such experiences in relation to modern-day mortality.
This thesis seeks to address this gap in the literature. Drawing upon thanatological discourse – that is, the analysis of society‘s perceptions of and reactions to death and dying – the research objective is to explore the potential of dark tourism as a means of contemplating mortality in (Western) societies.
In so doing, the thesis appraises dark tourism consumption within society, especially within a context of contemporary perspectives of death and, consequently, offers an integrated theoretical and empirical critical analysis and interpretation of death-related travel. The study adopts a phenomenological approach and a multiple case studies design with integrative and complementary methods of covert participation observation, semi-structure interviews (n = 64) and survey research (n = 419), as well as a focus group and a diarist account.
As a result, the thesis explores the fundamental interrelationships between visitors and sites that offer a representation of death.
In particular, the research examines these relationships at Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum & Memorial (Oświęcim, Poland), WTC Tribute Visitor Centre at Ground Zero (New York), Body Worlds exhibition at the O2 Arena (London), and the Dungeon visitor attractions ....





Related documents