A case study of campus‐based flexible learning using the World Wide Web and computer conferencingReport as inadecuate






Author: Brian Nicholson

Source: https://core.ac.uk/

This paper explores the use of the World Wide Web (WWW) integrated with computer conferencing as a teaching and learning tool. The aim of the study described was to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of online materials designed in a flexible learning format and integrated with a computer conference. It was hoped that this would create additional opportunity for group discourse between campus‐based students. The paper is divided in the following way: a discussion of the context to new developments in teaching and learning is followed by an introduction to the case study. Finally the findings of the case study are discussed with reference to research from the field of collaborative systems (Orlikowski, 1992; Grudin, 1994) as a framework for reflection. Some tentative conclusions are made for future work


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A case study of campus-based flexible learning using the World Wide Web and computer conferencing Brian Nicholson Information Technology Unit University of Salford This paper explores the use of the World Wide Web (WWW) integrated with computer conferencing as a teaching and learning tool.
The aim of the study described was to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of online materials designed in a flexible learning format and integrated with a computer conference.
It was hoped that this would create additional opportunity for group discourse between campus-based students.
The paper is divided in the following way: a discussion of the context to new developments in teaching and learning is followed by an introduction to the case study.
Finally the findings of the case study are discussed with reference to research from the field of collaborative systems (Orlikowski, 1992; Grudin, 1994) as a framework for reflection.
Some tentative conclusions are made for future work. Introduction The problem in context In line with departments in many other universities, the IT Institute (ITI) has experienced an increase in student numbers which has not been matched by a commensurate increase in funding or staff numbers.
Staff to student ratios have increased to the point where it has become impractical for small group tutorials to take place.
This position has affected job satisfaction and caused increasing doubts over the effectiveness of large group lectures for student learning.
Furthermore, it has been recognized that over the last ten years the makeup of the student population has radically changed, leading to a larger proportion of nontraditional students such as mature students with family responsibilities.
Related to this, many students are now in part-time or even full-time employment.
It is recognized that both these groups require greater flexibility in the time and place of their learning. Many universities are moving towards open or flexible learning to attract students from other parts of the country or abroad to study their courses locally.
This is part of a wider trend towards the Virtual University (Daniel, 1996) which can support learning across 38 ALT-J Volume 6 Number 3 time and distance.
The UK Open University has been a major influence in this area but the approach is entering into mainstream use as communications technology advances and becomes more widely available.
For instance the University of Salford is involved in the GEMISIS 2000 pro....



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