The broadside ballad and the woman's voiceReport as inadecuate






Author: Sandra Clark

Source: https://core.ac.uk/


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Birkbeck ePrints: an open access repository of the research output of Birkbeck College http:--eprints.bbk.ac.uk Clark, Sandra (2002) “The broadside ballad and the woman’s voice”.
In Debating gender in early modern England 1500-1700; edited by Cristina Malcolmson and Mihoko Suzuki.
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. pp.
103-120. This is an author-produced version of a chapter published in Debating gender in early modern England 1500-1700 (ISBN 0-312-29457-3).
It contains the full text as published, but does not include final publisher proof corrections, published layout or pagination. All articles available through Birkbeck ePrints are protected by intellectual property law, including copyright law.
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Copyright © 2002 Cristina Malcolmson and Mihoko Suzuki. Citation for this version: Clark, Sandra (2002) “The broadside ballad and the woman’s voice”.
London: Birkbeck ePrints.
Available at: http:--eprints.bbk.ac.uk-archive-00000549 Citation for the publisher’s version: Clark, Sandra (2002) “The broadside ballad and the woman’s voice”.
In Debating gender in early modern England 1500-1700; edited by Cristina Malcolmson and Mihoko Suzuki.
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
pp.
103-120. http:--eprints.bbk.ac.uk Contact Birkbeck ePrints at lib-eprints@bbk.ac.uk The Broadside Ballad and the Woman’s Voice Sandra Clark Despite a common view that the appeal of early modern street literature was to a predominantly male audience , there is ample evidence that the broadside ballad had a particular appeal for women.
Any account of its reception history would notice the many references in the period to the popularity of ballad-singing with young women.
In the eighteenth century it is claimed that most professional ballad-singers were women but in the seventeenth century, though a woman pedlar sometimes helped a male partner to sell ballads, there are only a few names of women actually known to have sung publicly before the Restoration.
One example is that of the wife of one William Nynges, who was ordered, with her husband, ‘not to singe Ballades nor to sell either Ballades or Alminackes in the market’.
Another is Nan Sharpe, a ballad singer referred to in Merlinus Anonymous 1653, about whom nothing more is known.
The traditional or folkballad was commonly transmitted through women’s singing , there are many references in the seventeenth century to women in domestic situations singi....






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