The role of object-oriented concepts in cognitive modelsReport as inadecuate






Author: Richard P. Cooper

Source: https://core.ac.uk/


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Birkbeck ePrints: an open access repository of the research output of Birkbeck College http:--eprints.bbk.ac.uk Cooper, Richard (2001).
The role of objectoriented concepts in cognitive models.
Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (8) 333. This is an author-produced version of a paper published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences (ISSN 1364-6613).
This version has been peer-reviewed but does not include the final publisher proof corrections, published layout or pagination. All articles available through Birkbeck ePrints are protected by intellectual property law, including copyright law.
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Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.
All rights reserved. Citation for this version: Cooper, Richard (2001).
The role of object-oriented concepts in cognitive models.
London: Birkbeck ePrints.
Available at: http:--eprints.bbk.ac.uk-archive-00000556 Citation for the publisher’s version: Cooper, Richard (2001).
The role of object-oriented concepts in cognitive models.
Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (8) 333. http:--eprints.bbk.ac.uk Contact Birkbeck ePrints at lib-eprints@bbk.ac.uk The role of object-oriented concepts in cognitive models Mather1 has recently argued that there are strong conceptual similarities between the objectoriented (OO) approach to computation that has emerged within Computer Science and a growing number of contemporary computational models of perceptual and cognitive processing.
He suggests that the OO approach, in which computation is effected by message passing between encapsulated “computational objects”, contrasts with the dominant view of computation within Cognitive Science – as sequential or stage-wise information processing.
Mather advocates embracing the OO approach, in anticipation that it “might promote the development of more sophisticated OOP models.” Mather is correct in his identification of the relation between the two approaches to computation, and his call for an explicit acknowledgement of that relation is well-advised.
However, Mather undersells the utility of OOP within cognitive modelling by presenting a case that is in some respects misleading and in others incomplete. The presentation is misleading in its juxtaposition of object-oriented concepts and object-based models of visual perception and attention.
Whilst such models may incorporate OO concepts, they are only illustrative: the OO approach is orthogonal to issues of object representation.
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