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Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.Hardell, Jens Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1162-4671Prakash, Braham Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1454-1118 2012 (English)In: 15th Nordic Symposium on Tribology - NordTrib 2012: 12 - 15 June 2012 - Trondheim, Norway, Trondheim: Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)

Abstract [en] : Machine components moving relative to each other at elevated temperatures can be found in applications such as power generation, aerospace, metal working, etc. The identification and understanding of the wear mechanisms are extremely important for solving problems related to systems operating at high temperatures. Presentation of the results in the form of wear maps enables e.g. design engineers to select appropriate materials for these applications [1, 2].In this study, unidirectional sliding wear tests of ultra-high strength boron steel against tool steel were conducted under unlubricated conditions using a pin-on-disc machine.Studies ranging from room temperature to 300 °C with a sliding speed of 0.2 ms-1 and a contact pressure of 2 MPa were carried out. Wear rates of both materials were obtained by weight loss measurements. Surface damage and chemical composition of tribolayers have been obtained by means of scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy to identify the dominant wear mechanism(s).The preliminary results have shown that the wear rate of boron steel decreased almost one order of magnitude as the temperature increased from room temperature to 300 °C. This behavior is consistent with the formation of a protective glaze layer initiated at 100°C. At higher temperatures, such layers become more extensive. The collected data was finally used to construct a wear map for this material pair that takes temperature into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages: Trondheim: Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2012.

National Category : Tribology

Research subject: Machine Elements

Identifiers: URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31358Local ID: 5848c72e-2908-4c3b-93e5-c87ebf9403f7OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-31358DiVA: diva2:1004592

Conference: Nordic Symposium on Tribology : 12/06/2012 - 15/06/2012

Note: Godkänd; 2012; 20120830 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-01-19Bibliographically approved



Autor: Hernandez, Sinuhe

Fuente: http://ltu.diva-portal.org/







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