Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxietyReportar como inadecuado


Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxiety


Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxiety - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Publication Date: 2012-07-09

Language: English

Type: Article

Metadata: Show full item record

Citation: Devine, A., Fawcett, K., Szűcs, D., & Dowker, A. (2012). Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxiety.

Description: RIGHTS : This article is licensed under the BioMed Central licence at http://www.biomedcentral.com/about/license which is similar to the 'Creative Commons Attribution Licence'. In brief you may : copy, distribute, and display the work; make derivative works; or make commercial use of the work - under the following conditions: the original author must be given credit; for any reuse or distribution, it must be made clear to others what the license terms of this work are.

Abstract: AbstractBackgroundMathematics anxiety (MA), a state of discomfort associated with performing mathematical tasks, is thought to affect a notable proportion of the school age population. Some research has indicated that MA negatively affects mathematics performance and that girls may report higher levels of MA than boys. On the other hand some research has indicated that boys’ mathematics performance is more negatively affected by MA than girls’ performance is. The aim of the current study was to measure girls’ and boys’ mathematics performance as well as their levels of MA while controlling for test anxiety (TA) a construct related to MA but which is typically not controlled for in MA studies.MethodsFour-hundred and thirty three British secondary school children in school years 7, 8 and 10 completed customised mental mathematics tests and MA and TA questionnaires.ResultsNo gender differences emerged for mathematics performance but levels of MA and TA were higher for girls than for boys. Girls and boys showed a positive correlation between MA and TA and a negative correlation between MA and mathematics performance. TA was also negatively correlated with mathematics performance, but this relationship was stronger for girls than for boys. When controlling for TA, the negative correlation between MA and performance remained for girls only. Regression analyses revealed that MA was a significant predictor of performance for girls but not for boys.ConclusionsOur study has revealed that secondary school children experience MA. Importantly, we controlled for TA which is typically not controlled for in MA studies. Girls showed higher levels of MA than boys and high levels of MA were related to poorer levels of mathematics performance. As well as potentially having a detrimental effect on ‘online’ mathematics performance, past research has shown that high levels of MA can have negative consequences for later mathematics education. Therefore MA warrants attention in the mathematics classroom, particularly because there is evidence that MA develops during the primary school years. Furthermore, our study showed no gender difference in mathematics performance, despite girls reporting higher levels of MA. These results might suggest that girls may have had the potential to perform better than boys in mathematics however their performance may have been attenuated by their higher levels of MA. Longitudinal research is needed to investigate the development of MA and its effect on mathematics performance.

Identifiers:

This record's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1744-9081-8-33http://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/243581

Rights:

Rights Holder: Amy Devine et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.





Autor: Devine, AmyFawcett, KayleighSzűcs, DénesDowker, Ann

Fuente: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/243581



DESCARGAR PDF




Documentos relacionados