Vol 9: Impairments in Goal-Directed Actions Predict Treatment Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder.Reportar como inadecuado



 Vol 9: Impairments in Goal-Directed Actions Predict Treatment Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder.


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This article is from PLoS ONE, volume 9.AbstractSocial anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive fear and habitual avoidance of social situations. Decision-making models suggest that patients with anxiety disorders may fail to exhibit goal-directed control over actions. We therefore investigated whether such biases may also be associated with social anxiety and to examine the relationship between such behavior with outcomes from cognitive-behavioral therapy. Patients diagnosed with social anxiety and controls completed an instrumental learning task in which two actions were performed to earn food outcomes. After outcome devaluation, where one outcome was consumed to satiety, participants were re-tested in extinction. Results indicated that, as expected, controls were goal-directed, selectively reducing responding on the action that previously delivered the devalued outcome. Patients with social anxiety, however, exhibited no difference in responding on either action. This loss of a devaluation effect was associated with greater symptom severity and poorer response to therapy. These findings indicate that variations in goal-directed control in social anxiety may represent both a behavioral endophenotype and may be used to predict individuals who will respond to learning-based therapies.



Autor: Alvares, Gail A.; Balleine, Bernard W.; Guastella, Adam J.

Fuente: https://archive.org/







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