Relations between man and environment in the development of precolonial settlements in the basin of mexico Report as inadecuate




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Investigaciones Geográficas (Mx) 2003, (50)

Author: Rubén López Recéndez

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/


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Investigaciones Geográficas (Mx) ISSN: 0188-4611 edito@igg.unam.mx Instituto de Geografía México López Recéndez, Rubén Relations between man and environment in the development of precolonial settlements in the basin of Mexico Investigaciones Geográficas (Mx), núm.
50, abril, 2003, pp.
166-172 Instituto de Geografía Distrito Federal, México Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=56905015 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative Investigaciones Geográficas, Boletín del Instituto de Geografía, UNAM No.
50, 2003, pp.
166-172 Rubén López Recéndez, geomorfólogo formado en Francia, fue director del Instituto de Geografía entre 1977 y 1983.
Estableció el primer laboratorio de muestras de suelo y agua en la dependencia para apoyar las investigaciones en geografía física. Relations between man and environment in the development of precolonial settlements in the basin of Mexico* Rubén López Recéndez For about 25,000 years, the basin of Mexico has been a scenary for human activities. Only the two last millenia of this period have been trascendental in the form of clear traces of such activities.
The balance of the time, which make up the proto and prehistory of human settlements in the basin is not well known. The present breakthroughs of archaeological research prove the human presence since the late Pleistocene, that is to say, 20,000 years B.C.
The findings of Tlapacoya belong to this cultural horizon, called -archaeolitic- by J.
L.
Lorenzo. These first testimonies exemplify cultural remains of lithic industries and their related Pleistocene fauna.
They contain chips, scrapers, and scalers, as well as knives that provide information on carving of hunted animals and work performed on hides and...





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