Chlamydia trachomatis-induced Fitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome: a case reportReport as inadecuate




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BMC Research Notes

, 10:10

Case reports

Abstract

BackgroundFitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome is defined as perihepatitis associated with pelvic inflammatory disease. Chlamydia trachomatis is one of its most common aetiologies. This syndrome usually presents with right upper quadrant abdominal pain mimicking other hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal pathologies, hence, posing a diagnostic dilemma in settings with limited diagnostic tools.

Case reportA 32 year old African female presented with acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vaginal discharge, for which she had previously received treatment in another health center with no improvement. Clinical and laboratory findings were suggestive of Fitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome. Five days after treatment with oral doxycycline, the patient showed marked clinical improvement.

ConclusionFitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome is a common cause of right upper quadrant pain which is often under diagnosed in poor communities. Hence, it should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain, especially in females of reproductive age.

KeywordsFitz Hugh–Curtis syndrome Chlamydia trachomatis Resource-limited setting AbbreviationsFHCSFitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome

PIDpelvic inflammatory disease

STDsexually transmitted disease

STIssexually transmitted infections

ASTaspartate aminotransferase

ALTalanine aminotransferase

CDCcenters for disease control and prevention

RUQright upper quadrant abdomen

CRPC-reactive protein

WBCwhite blood cell count

ESRerythrocyte sedimentation rate

TPHAtreponema pallidum hemagglutination assay

VDRLvenereal disease research laboratory

HIVhuman immunodeficiency virus

CTcomputed tomography

PCRpolymerase chain reaction

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Author: Cyril Jabea Ekabe - Jules Kehbila - Tsi Njim - Benjamin Momo Kadia - Celestine Ntemlefack Tendonge - Gottlieb Lobe Monek

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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