Unusual explosive growth of a squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp after electrical burn injury and subsequent coverage by sequential free flap vascular connection – a case reportReport as inadecuate




Unusual explosive growth of a squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp after electrical burn injury and subsequent coverage by sequential free flap vascular connection – a case report - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

BMC Cancer

, 5:150

First Online: 28 November 2005Received: 27 July 2005Accepted: 28 November 2005DOI: 10.1186-1471-2407-5-150

Cite this article as: Horch, R.E., Stark, G.B. & Beier, J.P. BMC Cancer 2005 5: 150. doi:10.1186-1471-2407-5-150

Abstract

BackgroundSquamous cell carcinomos may arise from chronic ulcerating wounds in scars, most commonly postburn scars. Tumour growth usually takes place over months to years. Localization on the scalp is a relatively rare condition.

Case presentationThis report presents the case of a 63-year-old man with chronic ulceration of a postburn scar of the scalp due to an electrical burn 58 years ago. Sudden tumour growth started within weeks and on presentation already had extended through the skull into frontal cortex. After radical tumour resection, defect was covered with a free radial forearm flap. Local recurrence occurred 6 weeks later. Subsequent wide excision including discard of the flap and preservation of the radial vessels was followed by transfer of a free latissimus dorsi muscle flap, using the radial vessels of the first flap as recipient vessels. The patient received radiotherapy post-operatively. There were no problems with flap survivals or wound healing. Due to rapidly growing recurrence the patient died 2 months later.

ConclusionExplosive SCC tumour growth might occur in post-burn scars after more than 50 years. As a treatment option the use of sequential free flap connections might serve in repeated extensive tumour resections, especially in the scalp region, where suitable donor vessels are often located in distance to the defect.

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1471-2407-5-150 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Author: Raymund E Horch - G Bjoern Stark - Justus P Beier

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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