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Transect, Stabilization, Plant, C-13, Soil organic-matter, Litter, Populus-tremuloides, Decomposition, Growth, Carbon allocation

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Subject-Keyword: Transect Stabilization Plant C-13 Soil organic-matter Litter Populus-tremuloides Decomposition Growth Carbon allocation

Type of item: Journal Article Published

Language: English

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Description: Abstract: Enriching plant tissues with C-13 and N-15 isotopes has provided long-lasting, non-reactive tracers to quantify rates of terrestrial elemental fluxes e.g., soil organic matter decomposition. However, the molecular location and level of isotope enrichment may differ among plant tissues. This factor is central to the integrity and interpretation of tracer data, but is seldom considered in experiments. We propose a rapid, non-destructive method to quantify molecular isotope allocation using solid-state C-13 and N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. With this method, we tracked and quantified the fate of multiple pulses of CO2-C-13g and K NO3-N-151 in boreal tree seedling roots and leaves as a function of time. Results show that initial preferential C-13 carbohydrate enrichment in the leaves was followed by redistribution to more complex compounds after seven days. While C-13 allocation within the roots was uniform across molecules, N-15 results indicate an initial enrichment of amine molecules after two hours.

Date created: 2012

DOI: doi:10.7939-R32805244

License information: Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 Unported

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Autor: Norris, C. E. Quideau, S. A. Landhausser, S. M. Bernard, G. M. Wasylishen, R. E.

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



SUBJECT AREAS: ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES SOLID EARTH SCIENCES BIOGEOCHEMISTRY Tracking Stable Isotope Enrichment in Tree Seedlings with Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Charlotte E.
Norris1, Sylvie A.
Quideau1, Simon M.
Landhäusser1, Guy M.
Bernard2 & Roderick E.
Wasylishen2 1 Received 27 June 2012 Accepted 13 September 2012 Published 9 October 2012 Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to C.E.N.
(charlotte. norris@ualberta.ca) 2 Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 442 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E3, Canada, Gunning-Lemieux Chemistry Centre, Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G2, Canada. Enriching plant tissues with 13C and 15N isotopes has provided long-lasting, non-reactive tracers to quantify rates of terrestrial elemental fluxes (e.g., soil organic matter decomposition).
However, the molecular location and level of isotope enrichment may differ among plant tissues.
This factor is central to the integrity and interpretation of tracer data, but is seldom considered in experiments.
We propose a rapid, non-destructive method to quantify molecular isotope allocation using solid-state 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
With this method, we tracked and quantified the fate of multiple pulses of 13 CO2(g) and K 15NO3(l) in boreal tree seedling roots and leaves as a function of time.
Results show that initial preferential 13C carbohydrate enrichment in the leaves was followed by redistribution to more complex compounds after seven days.
While 13C allocation within the roots was uniform across molecules, 15 N results indicate an initial enrichment of amine molecules after two hours. T errestrial ecosystems are changing due to anthropogenic pressures, leading to far-reaching effects on global biogeochemical cycles.
Assessing the net CO2 flux between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere remains one of the largest uncertainties in understanding of the ...





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