Review of From Polysemy to Semantic Change: Towards a Typology of Lexical Semantic AssociationsReportar como inadecuado




Review of From Polysemy to Semantic Change: Towards a Typology of Lexical Semantic Associations - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

From Polysemy to Semantic Change. Towards a Typology of Lexical Semantic Associations Nonfiction work - Book reviews, Books - Book reviews

Additional contributors:

Subject-Keyword: From Polysemy to Semantic Change. Towards a Typology of Lexical Semantic Associations Nonfiction work - Book reviews Books - Book reviews

Type of item: Review

Language: English

Place:

Time:

Description: This volume is introduced in the foreword vii as the product of a project begun in 2002 at the Fédération de Recherche Typologie et Universaux Linguistiques of the French National Centre for Scientific Research. It consists of three parts: ‘State of the art’ one chapter, ‘Theoretical and methodological issues’ seven chapters, and ‘Case studies’ six chapters. I focus here mainly on the first two parts where the more substantive theoretical issues are raised, without intending to diminish the value of the case studies.

Date created: 2010

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3F18SH5X

License information:

Rights: © 2010 John Newman. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original authors and source must be cited.





Autor: Newman, John

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



)URPSRO-VHP-WRVHPDQWLFFKDQJH7RZDUGVDW-SRORJ- RIOH[LFDOVHPDQWLFDVVRFLDWLRQV UHYLHZ -RKQ1HZPDQ Language, Volume 86, Number 2, June 2010, pp.
473-475 (Review) 3XEOLVKHGE--LQJXLVWLF6RFLHW-RI$PHULFD DOI: 10.1353-lan.0.0211 For additional information about this article http:--muse.jhu.edu-journals-lan-summary-v086-86.2.newman.html Access provided by The University of Alberta (10 Jun 2015 17:09 GMT) REVIEWS 473 From polysemy to semantic change: Towards a typology of lexical semantic associations.
Ed.
by MARTINE VANHOVE.
(Studies in language companion series 106.) Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2008.
Pp.
xiii, 404.
ISBN 9789027205735.
$165 (Hb). Reviewed by JOHN NEWMAN, University of Alberta This volume is introduced in the foreword (vii) as the product of a project begun in 2002 at the Fédération de Recherche Typologie et Universaux Linguistiques of the French National Centre for Scientific Research.
It consists of three parts: ‘State of the art’ (one chapter), ‘Theoretical and methodological issues’ (seven chapters), and ‘Case studies’ (six chapters).
I focus here mainly on the first two parts where the more substantive theoretical issues are raised, without intending to diminish the value of the case studies. In her chapter ‘Approaching lexical typology’, MARIA KOPTJEVSKAJA-TAMM provides a wideranging overview of the areas of research that constitute the field of lexical typology.
She makes it clear that the types of words that are of primary interest in this connection are ‘words as carriers of lexical meanings’ (8), where lexical is presumably to be contrasted with grammatical (though grammaticalizations are mentioned later).
Issues discussed include polysemy, denotation vs.
descriptive meaning, and how words carve up some semantic space (e.g.
body parts).
One section is given over to the question of what meanings can or cannot be expressed by a single word in languages, for example, how many different lexemes a language uses...





Documentos relacionados