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Journal Title:

Experimental Gerontology

Volume:

Volume 70

Publisher:

Elsevier | 2015-10-01, Pages 32-36

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract: Background: Epidemiological and objective studies report an association between sedentary time and lower risk of the metabolic syndrome MetS and its risk factors in young and middle-age adults. To date, there is a lack of objective data on the association between sedentary time and MetS among older adults.Methods: The association between objectively measured sedentary time accelerometry with MetS and MetS components was examined in a large sample of older adults with mobility limitations N = 1198; mean age = 78.7 ± 5.3 years enrolled in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders LIFE study. Participants were divided into tertiles according to percentage of daily sedentary time, and the relation between sedentary time with MetS and MetS components was examined after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and BMI.Results: Participants in the highest sedentary time tertile had significantly higher odds of MetS OR = 1.54 95% CI 1.13 to 2.11 in comparison with participants in the lowest tertile p = 0.03. Participants in the highest sedentary time tertile had larger waist circumference p = 0.0001 and lower HDL-C p = 0.0003 than participants in the lowest sedentary time tertile.Conclusions: Sedentary time was strongly related to higher odds of MetS. These results, based on objectively measured sedentary time, suggest that sedentary time may represent an important risk factor for the development of MetS in older adults with high likelihood for disability.

Subjects: Gerontology - Health Sciences, Epidemiology - Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy - Research Funding: The LIFE Study is funded by a National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Aging Cooperative Agreement # U01AG22376 and a supplement from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute 3U01AG022376.

It is sponsored in part by the Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health.

Support was provided by the University of Florida’s Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center NIH-NIA P30AG028740, and Clinical and Translational Science Institute NIH-NCRR UL1TR000064.

Stephen Anton was previously supported by the Thomas H. Maren Foundation.

Keywords: Science and Technology - Life Sciences and Biomedicine - Geriatrics and Gerontology - Aging - Accelerometry - Glucose - Disability - Waist circumference - PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY - CARDIOMETABOLIC RISK - STYLE INTERVENTIONS - BEHAVIOR - INDEPENDENCE - GUIDELINES - EXERCISE -



Autor: Robert T. Mankowski, Mylene Aubertin-Leheudre, Daniel P. Beavers, Anda Botoseneanu, Thomas W. Buford, Timothy Church, Nancy W. Gl

Fuente: https://open.library.emory.edu/



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