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Resource management, Land occupancy, Traditional land use

Additional contributors:

Subject-Keyword: Resource management Land occupancy Traditional land use

Type of item: Report

Language: English

Place: Canada, Alberta

Time:

Description: Working Paper 1999-16

Date created: 1999

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3VH5CK4S

License information: Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 3.0 Unported

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Autor: MacKinnon, Laura Apentik, Caesar Robinson, Michael

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



WORKING PAPER 1999-16 FOR INTERNAL CIRCULATION ONLY Revisiting Traditional Land Use and Occupancy Studies: Relevance and Implications for Resource Management in Alberta Laura MacKinnon, Caesar Apentik, and Michael P.
Robinson For copies of this or other SFM publications contact: Sustainable Forest Management Network G208 Biological Sciences Building University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9 Ph: (780) 492 6659 Fax: (780) 492 8160 http:--www.biology.ualberta.ca-sfm This Working Paper is published by the Sustainable Forest Management Network.
All Network Researchers are invited to present ideas and research results in this forum to accelerate their application and to foster interdisciplinary discussion on knowledge, strategies and tools leading to sustainable management of Canadas boreal forest. Working Papers are published without peer review. This is an internal document of the SFM Network.
Do not cite this Working Paper without the expressed written consent of the author(s). Revisiting Traditional Land Use and Occupancy Studies: Relevance and Implications for Resource Management in Alberta Background to the study The use of traditional knowledge and institutions as a formal research paradigm in development policies, especially resource and environmental management, is fairly recent. However, interest in the topic has its origins in anthropology and has for a long time remained the domain of anthropologists.
Most of the early works on the subject were geared towards the construction of models and theories that could help outsiders (Westerners) to understand how traditional societies function, and why they function in certain ways.
Traditional knowledge was not studied to understand its role in the socioeconomic and political development of traditional societies.
Traditional knowledge, which is grounded in social institutions and mediated by social practices, has been regarded as superstitious or non-scientific, and consequently of no practical use for...





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