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Assistive Technology, Robotics, Rehabilitation

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Subject-Keyword: Assistive Technology Robotics Rehabilitation

Type of item: Journal Article Draft-Submitted

Language: English

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DOI: doi:10.7939-R30000166

License information: Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 Unported

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Author: Kim Adams

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


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3-59 Corbett Hall – University of Alberta Edmonton, AB T6G 2G4 Ph: (780) 492-5422 Fx: (780) 492-1696 Email: atlab@ualberta.ca Lego Robot Control via a Speech Generating Communication Device for Operational and Communicative Goals Kim Adams1,2, PhD(c), Julie Yantha1, MSc SLP, Al Cook1, PhD Medicine, University of Alberta, and 2Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital; Edmonton, Alberta 1Rehabilitation ABSTRACT Children with disabilities can exert control over play activities using robots.
Controlling robots through a speech generating communication device (SGD) could provide an integrated and rich play environment.
This study replicated a previous switch controlled Lego robotic play study, but used the infrared capability of a SGD.
A single participant progressed through various robot play activities in which communication was encouraged.
Goal Attainment Scaling was used to measure intervention effect on operational and communicative goals.
The participant obtained an increased operational goal score and although the communicative goal score did not increase, valuable information was obtained for future studies. INTRODUCTION Research has shown that children with severe disabilities who use robots can exert control over play activities, demonstrate cognitive skills not measurable with standardized tests, and appear more capable to teachers who witness students’ success with robotic control (1-3).
Recent robot studies utilized a switch adapted infrared (IR) controller to allow play activities with inexpensive Legoi robots (4).
Using the built-in IR capability of speech generating communication devices (SGDs) to control toys “offers highly motivating activities for use in the development of language” (e.g., -come- -go-, -in- -out-)(5, p.
7).
Two results in the robot studies have shown the need to integrate robotic play with augmentative communication.
First, an increased number of vocalizations during and after robotic intervention was observed in children who were ...





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