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Val Plumwood, J. Baird Callicott, Eric Katz, wilderness, Holmes Rolston III

Woodrooffe, Daphne Sophia

Supervisor and department: Taylor, Chloe Philosophy Welchman, Jennifer Philosophy

Examining committee member and department: Welchman, Jennifer Philosophy Taylor, Chloe Philosophy Dalal, Neil Philosophy Kowalsky, Nathan St. Joseph's College

Department: Department of Philosophy

Specialization:

Date accepted: 2011-08-25T16:33:42Z

Graduation date: 2011-11

Degree: Master of Arts

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: First and foremost, this work offers a critical review of recent influential environmental theorists’ efforts to construct and defend normatively significant accounts of wilderness. As such, this work focuses on the definitions provided by environmental philosophers Eric Katz, Holmes Rolston III, J. Baird Callicott, Steven Vogel, and Val Plumwood. I suggest that insofar as Katz and Rolston rely on the problematically construed human-nature dichotomy, their definitions and moral arguments for the preservation of wilderness fail. While J. Baird Callicott’s definition provides an accurate account of wilderness, his ethical framework limits its normative force. Since Val Plumwood does not rely on the human-nature dichotomy, nor does she attempt to assign intrinsic value to wilderness and wild entities, her approach is the most successful.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3ST55

Rights: License granted by Sophie Woodrooffe woodroof@ualberta.ca on 2011-08-23T15:35:40Z GMT: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Autor: Woodrooffe, Daphne Sophia

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



University of Alberta Where the Wild Things Are: Exploring the Concept of Wilderness and its Moral Implications by Daphne Sophia Woodrooffe A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts Department of Philosophy ©Daphne Sophia Woodrooffe Fall 2011 Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only.
Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the authors prior written permission. Abstract First and foremost, this work offers a critical review of recent influential environmental theorists’ efforts to construct and defend normatively significant accounts of wilderness.
As such, this work focuses on the definitions provided by environmental philosophers Eric Katz, Holmes Rolston III, J.
Baird Callicott, Steven Vogel, and Val Plumwood.
I suggest that insofar as Katz and Rolston rely on the problematically construed human-nature dichotomy, their definitions and moral arguments for the preservation of wilderness fail.
While J.
Baird Callicott’s definition provides an accurate account of wilderness, his ethical framework limits its normative force.
Since Val Plumwood does not rely on the human-nature dichotomy, nor does she attempt to assign intrinsic value to wilderness and wild entities, her approach is the most successful. Acknowledgements For the opportunity to pursue this project, I thank the Depa...





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