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marijuana, peers, adolescent, knowledge

Medori, Joy Christine

Supervisor and department: Skrypnek, Berna Human Ecology Harach, Lori Human Ecology

Examining committee member and department: Wild, Cameron School of Public Health

Department: Department of Human Ecology

Specialization:

Date accepted: 2011-04-19T20:29:22Z

Graduation date: 2011-06

Degree: Master of Science

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: To better understand the relationship of parent and peer factors in contributing to adolescent marijuana use, the present study investigated the direct and indirect effects of perceived parental knowledge and best friend drug use on adolescent marijuana use. Survey responses from 2552 grade 10, 11, and 12 students were used to explore these relationships. As expected, perceived parental knowledge had significant negative relationships with marijuana use and best friend use and best friend use had a significant positive relationship with marijuana use. As expected, males reported more marijuana use and more best friend use than did females. Yet females reported higher levels of perceived parental knowledge than males. Logistic regression revealed that best friend use partially mediated the relationship between perceived parental knowledge and marijuana use. Contrary to expectations, the mediation relationship was the same for males and females. Implications of the findings for the mediation model are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R35928

Rights: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Autor: Medori, Joy Christine

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



University of Alberta Parents and Peers: Understanding Direct and Indirect Effects on Adolescent Marijuana Use by Joy Medori A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science In Family Ecology and Practice Human Ecology © Joy Medori Spring 2011 Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only.
Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the authors prior written permission. ii DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to my best friend – my husband – whose kindness, love, support, laughter, and friendship throughout, was pivotal in helping me cross the finish line. iii Abstract To better understand the relationship of parent and peer factors in contributing to adolescent marijuana use, the present study investigated the direct and indirect effects of perceived parental knowledge and best friend drug use on adolescent marijuana use.
Survey responses from 2552 grade 10, 11, and 12 students were used to explore these relationships.
As expected, perceived parental knowledge had significant negative relationships with marijuana use and best friend use and best friend use had a significant positive relationship with marijuana use.
As expected, males reported more marijuana use and more best friend use than did females. Yet females reported higher levels of perceived parental knowledge than males.
Logistic regr...





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