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implant, electric double layer capacitor, medical implant communication service, scoliosis surgery, wireless telemetry

Zbinden, Daniel

Supervisor and department: Durdle, Nelson Electrical and Computer Engineering Lou, Edmond Electrical and Computer Engineering

Examining committee member and department: Zhao, Vicky Electrical and Computer Engineering Duke, Kajsa Mechanical Engineering

Department: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Specialization:

Date accepted: 2011-01-11T19:03:48Z

Graduation date: 2011-06

Degree: Master of Science

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: Surgical correction of scoliosis is a complicated mechanical process. Understanding the loads applied to the spine and providing immediate feedback to surgeons during scoliosis surgery will prevent overloading, improve surgical outcome and patient safety. Long-term development of residual forces in the spinal instrument after surgery with the continual curvature changes over time has been unknown. The goal of this research work was to develop a wireless implantable sensor platform to investigate the loads during and after surgery. This thesis describes research leading to the design of a sensor platform that uses both 403 MHz and 2.45 GHz for wireless communication, and reports the resolution and accuracy of the built-in temperature sensor, the A-D accuracy of the sensing platform, the power consumption at different operation modes, the range of the wireless communication and the discharge characteristics of a potential capacitive power module.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R36W7B

Rights: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Autor: Zbinden, Daniel

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



University of Alberta Wireless Implantable Load Monitoring System for Scoliosis Surgery by Daniel Zbinden A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering ©Daniel Zbinden Spring 2011 Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only.
Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the authors prior written permission. Examining Committee Dr.
Nelson Durdle, Electrical and Computer Engineering Dr.
Edmond Lou, Electrical and Computer Engineering Dr.
Vicky Zhao, Electrical and Computer Engineering Dr.
Kajsa Duke, Mechanical Engineering Abstract Surgical correction of scoliosis is a complicated mechanical process.
Understanding the loads applied to the spine and providing immediate feedback to surgeons during scoliosis surgery will prevent overloading, improve surgical outcome and patient safety.
Longterm development of residual forces in the spinal instrument after surgery with the continual curvature changes over time has been unknown.
The goal of this research work was to develop a wireless implantable sensor platform to investigate the loads during and after surgery.
This thesis describes research leading to the design of a sensor platform that uses both 403 MHz and 2.45 GHz for wireless communication, and reports the resoluti...





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