Antibiotic Self-Prescribing Trends, Experiences and Attitudes in Upper Respiratory Tract Infection among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students: A Study from LahoreReportar como inadecuado




Antibiotic Self-Prescribing Trends, Experiences and Attitudes in Upper Respiratory Tract Infection among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students: A Study from Lahore - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Pharmacists are the custodians of drugs; hence their education, training, behaviors and experiences would affect the future use of drugs at community and hospital pharmacies. Therefore, we aimed at evaluating the self-prescribing antibiotic trends, knowledge and attitudes among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. We found that pharmacy students had higher risks of experiencing URIs related symptoms such as cough RR; 1.7, p = 0.002, allergy RR; 2.07, p = 0.03 and running nose RR; 3.17, p<0.005, compared to non-pharmacy students -resulting in higher probabilities of selecting cough syrups OR; 2.3, p<0.005, anti-histamines OR; 1.8, p = 0.036 and anti-inflammatory-anti-pyretic OR; 2.4, p<0.005 drugs. Likewise, bachelor’s degree pupils OR; 2, p = 0.045, urban area residents OR; 2.44; p = 0.002 and pharmacy students OR; 2.9, p<0.005 exhibited higher propensities of antibiotic self-use–notable classes include, b-lactams 45.9% followed by macrolides 26.5% and augmentin 28.94%, respectively. Surprisingly, pharmacy and non-pharmacy students had higher odds of using antibiotics in common cold OR; 3.2, p<0.005 and pain OR; 2.37, p = 0.015, respectively. Unlike non-pharmacy students, pharmacy students were likely to select alternative therapy, such as Joshanda OR; 2.22, p = 0.011 and were well acquainted with antibiotic hazards, with 77% reduction in risk of antibiotics re-use. In conclusion, university students exhibited antibiotic self-prescribing trends in conditions that does not warrant their use, thus are irrational users. The pharmacy education confers very little benefit to rational self-prescribing practices among students, while non-pharmacy students are more vulnerable to repeated antibiotic usage. Thus, the educational and training modules should be designed for university students to disseminate targeted information regarding the potential hazards of antibiotic self-use and importance of consultation with qualified and registered medical doctor-pharmacist before starting with antibiotics.



Autor: Zikria Saleem, Hamid Saeed , Mobasher Ahmad, Mahrukh Yousaf, Hafsa Binte Hassan, Ayesha Javed, Nida Anees, Sonu Maharjan

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



DESCARGAR PDF




Documentos relacionados