Assessment of the Effect of Intestinal Permeability Probes Lactulose And Mannitol and Other Liquids on Digesta Residence Times in Various Segments of the Gut Determined by Wireless Motility Capsule: A Randomised Controlled TrialReportar como inadecuado




Assessment of the Effect of Intestinal Permeability Probes Lactulose And Mannitol and Other Liquids on Digesta Residence Times in Various Segments of the Gut Determined by Wireless Motility Capsule: A Randomised Controlled Trial - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Background

Whilst the use of the mannitol-lactulose test for intestinal permeability has been long established it is not known whether the doses of these sugars modify transit time Similarly it is not known whether substances such as aspirin that are known to increase intestinal permeability to lactulose and mannitol and those such as ascorbic acid which are stated to be beneficial to gastrointestinal health also influence intestinal transit time.

Methods

Gastric and intestinal transit times were determined with a SmartPill following consumption of either a lactulose mannitol solution, a solution containing 600 mg aspirin, a solution containing 500 mg of ascorbic acid or an extract of blackcurrant, and compared by doubly repeated measures ANOVA with those following consumption of the same volume of a control in a cross-over study in six healthy female volunteers. The dominant frequencies of cyclic variations in gastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill were determined by fast Fourier transforms.

Results

The gastric transit times of lactulose mannitol solutions, of aspirin solutions and of blackcurrant juice did not differ from those of the control. The gastric transit times of the ascorbic acid solutions were significantly shorter than those of the other solutions. There were no significant differences between the various solutions either in the total small intestinal or colonic transit times. The intraluminal pHs during the initial quartiles of the small intestinal transit times were lower than those in the succeeding quartiles. This pattern did not vary with the solution that was consumed. The power of the frequencies of cyclic variation in intragastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill declined exponentially with increase in frequency and did not peak at the reported physiological frequencies of gastric contractile activity.

Conclusions

Whilst the segmental residence times were broadly similar to those using other methods, the high degree of variation between subjects generally precluded the identification of all but gross variation between treatments. The lack of any differences between treatments in either total small or large intestinal transit times indicates that the solutions administered in the lactulose mannitol test of permeability had no consistent influence on the temporal pattern of absorption. The negatively exponential profile and lack of any peaks in the frequency spectra of cyclic variation in gastric intraluminal pressure that were consistent with reported physiological frequencies of contractile activity profile suggests that the principal source of this variation is stochastic likely resulting from the effects of external events occasioned by normal daily activities on intra-abdominal pressure.

Trial Registration

Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615000596505



Autor: Ivana R. Sequeira, Roger G. Lentle , Marlena C. Kruger, Roger D. Hurst

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



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