Probiotics Blunt the Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Blueberry Feeding in Hypertensive Rats without Altering Hippuric Acid ProductionReport as inadecuate




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Previously we showed that feeding polyphenol-rich wild blueberries to hypertensive rats lowered systolic blood pressure. Since probiotic bacteria produce bioactive metabolites from berry polyphenols that enhance the health benefits of berry consumption, we hypothesized that adding probiotics to a blueberry-enriched diet would augment the anti-hypertensive effects of blueberry consumption. Groups n = 8 of male spontaneously hypertensive rats were fed one of four AIN ‘93G-based diets for 8 weeks: Control CON; 3% freeze-dried wild blueberry BB; 1% probiotic bacteria PRO; or 3% BB + 1% PRO BB+PRO. Blood pressure was measured at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 by the tail-cuff method, and urine was collected at weeks 4 and 8 to determine markers of oxidative stress F2-isoprostanes, nitric oxide synthesis nitrites, and polyphenol metabolism hippuric acid. Data were analyzed using mixed models ANOVA with repeated measures. Diet had a significant main effect on diastolic blood pressure p = 0.046, with significantly lower measurements in the BB- vs. CON-fed rats p = 0.035. Systolic blood pressure showed a similar but less pronounced response to diet p = 0.220, again with the largest difference between the BB and CON groups. Absolute increase in blood pressure between weeks 0 and 8 tended to be smaller in the BB and PRO vs. CON and BB+PRO groups systolic increase, p = 0.074; diastolic increase, p = 0.185. Diet had a significant main effect on hippuric acid excretion p<0.0001, with 2- and ~1.5-fold higher levels at weeks 4 and 8, respectively, in the BB and BB+PRO vs. PRO and CON groups. Diet did not have a significant main effect on F2-isoprostane p = 0.159 or nitrite excretion p = 0.670. Our findings show that adding probiotics to a blueberry-enriched diet does not enhance and actually may impair the anti-hypertensive effect of blueberry consumption. However, probiotic bacteria are not interfering with blueberry polyphenol metabolism into hippuric acid.



Author: Cynthia Blanton , Zhengcheng He , Katherine T. Gottschall-Pass , Marva I. Sweeney

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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