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Landslides, Instrumentation, Thompson River Valley, Geohazards

Schafer, Matthew B.

Supervisor and department: Martin, Derek Civil and Environmental Engineering Hendry, Michael Civil and Environmental Engineering

Examining committee member and department: Cruden, David Civil and Environmental Engineering Beier, Nicholas Civil and Environmental Engineering Hendry, Michael Civil and Environmental Engineering Martin, Derek Civil and Environmental Engineering

Department: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Specialization: Geotechnical Engineering

Date accepted: 2016-07-25T09:39:04Z

Graduation date: 2016-06:Fall 2016

Degree: Master of Science

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: The Ripley Landslide is one of several slow moving landslides in the Thompson River Valley, near Ashcroft, British Columbia. Both the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railway main lines cross this landslide. As a result, the site is an important part of Canada-s transportation network and has been investigated and monitored with the goal of developing an operational strategy to aid in the safe operation of the railroads. A summary of the site investigation and monitoring results at the Ripley landslide are presented in this thesis, including information not used in previous publications. The monitoring results have been validated to ensure that the data are representative of the landslide behaviour. The updated geological and monitoring data are then analysed to develop cross sections and gain a better understanding of the kinematics of the Ripley Landslide and the mechanisms controlling its behaviour.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3VQ2SG4B

Rights: This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.





Autor: Schafer, Matthew B.

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



Kinematics and Controlling Mechanics of the Slow Moving Ripley Landslide by Matthew B.
Schafer A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science In Geotechnical Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Alberta © Matthew B.
Schafer, 2016 Abstract The Ripley Landslide is one of several slow moving landslides in the Thompson River Valley, near Ashcroft, British Columbia.
Both the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railway main lines cross this landslide.
As a result, the site is an important part of Canadas transportation network and has been investigated and monitored with the goal of developing an operational strategy to aid in the safe operation of the railroads. A summary of the site investigation and monitoring results at the Ripley landslide are presented in this thesis, including information not used in previous publications.
The monitoring results have been validated to ensure that the data are representative of the landslide behaviour.
The updated geological and monitoring data are then analysed to develop cross sections and gain a better understanding of the kinematics of the Ripley Landslide and the mechanisms controlling its behaviour. ii “For no man can lay a foundation other than the one which is laid…” 1 Corinthians 3:11 iii Acknowledgements I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Dr.
C.D.
Martin and Dr.
M.T.
Hendry for their supervision and guidance in this thesis work.
Their insight, guidance, and financial support were essential in completing the goals of this research.
I would also like to thank Dr.
R.
Macciotta for his constant support and valuable advice. Gratitude is also extended to all of the professors in the geotechnical group, particularly Dr.
R Chalaturnyk, Dr.
D.H.
Chan, Dr.
G.
Wilson, Dr.
D.M Cruden, and Dr.
N.R.
Morgenstern. Conversations with each of you during my time at the university have contributed to my professional an...





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