Intimate Injection Partnerships Are at Elevated Risk of High-Risk Injecting: A Multi-Level Longitudinal Study of HCV-Serodiscordant Injection Partnerships in San Francisco, CAReportar como inadecuado




Intimate Injection Partnerships Are at Elevated Risk of High-Risk Injecting: A Multi-Level Longitudinal Study of HCV-Serodiscordant Injection Partnerships in San Francisco, CA - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Background

It is increasingly recognized that the risk for HIV and hepatitis C HCV transmission among people who inject drugs PWID, such as syringe sharing, occurs in the context of relationships between at least two people. Evidence suggests that the risk associated with injection behavior varies with injection partner types.

Methods

We utilized longitudinal dyad-level data from a study of young PWID from San Francisco 2006 to 2013 to investigate the relationship-level factors influencing high-risk injecting within HCV-serodiscordant injection partners i.e., individuals who injected together ≥5 times in the prior month. Utilizing data from 70 HCV-serodiscordant injection partnerships, we used generalized linear models to examine relationship-level predictors i.e., partnership composition, partnership closeness, and partnership dynamics of: 1 receptive syringe sharing RSS; and 2 receptive cooker use RCU, as reported by the HCV-negative injection partner.

Results

As reported by the -at-risk- HCV-negative injection partner, receptive syringe sharing RSS and receptive cooker use RCU were 19% and 33% at enrollment, and 11% and 12% over all visits total follow-up time 55 person-years resulting in 13 new HCV-infections incidence rate: 23.8-100 person-years. Person-level factors, injection partnership composition, and partnership dynamics were not significantly associated with either RSS or RCU. Instead, intimate injection partnerships those who lived together and were also in a sexual relationship were independently associated with a 5-times greater risk of both RSS and a 7-times greater risk of RCU when compared to injecting only partnerships.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest a positive, and amplified effect of relationship factors on injecting drug risk behaviors among young PWID injection partnerships. The majority of interventions to reduce injection drug use related harms focus on individual-based education to increase drug use knowledge. Our findings support the need to expand harm reduction strategies to relationship-based messaging and interventions.



Autor: Meghan D. Morris , Jennifer Evans, Martha Montgomery, Michelle Yu, Alya Briceno, Kimberly Page, Judith A. Hahn

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



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