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sports injury, concussions, psychological risk factors, ice hockey

Hofmann, Jamieson C

Supervisor and department: Mrazik, Martin Educational Psychology

Examining committee member and department: Mrazik, Martin Educational Psychology Rinaldi, Christina Educational Psychology Mosewich, Amber Physical Education and Recreation

Department: Department of Educational Psychology

Specialization: School and Clinical Child Psychology

Date accepted: 2016-09-06T13:21:00Z

Graduation date: 2016-06:Fall 2016

Degree: Master of Education

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: Psychological factors have been shown to play a role in the frequency and severity of injury among athletes. The Behaviour Assessment System for Children Second Edition BASC-II was utilized to measure sixteen psychological factors and determine whether these factors predicted rate and severity of total injury and concussion versus musculoskeletal MSK injuries. Participants included male Bantam and Midget level ice hockey players n=524. Participants completed the BASC-II at baseline and post injury. Injury records were completed by team designates during the hockey season during a period of six months. The five main factors included in the regression model were sensation seeking, locus of control, anxiety, depression and attention problems. The result suggested that together the five main factors could explain 10.7% of total injury occurrence and 12.0% of MSK injury occurrence. The five main factors did not significantly predict concussion occurrence or injury severity. Attention problems alone significantly predicted total injury and concussion occurrence and injury severity. Locus of control and depression significantly predicted MSK injuries. Knowledge of these psychological risk factors should guide psychosocial risk assessment and subsequent interventions.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3X34N31G

Rights: This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.





Autor: Hofmann, Jamieson C

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



Psychosocial Risk Factors of Sports Injury Occurrence and Severity among Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players by Jamieson Claire Hofmann A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education in School and Clinical Child Psychology Department of Educational Psychology University of Alberta © Jamieson Claire Hofmann, 2016 ii Abstract Psychological factors have been shown to play a role in the frequency and severity of injury among athletes.
The Behaviour Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-II) was utilized to measure sixteen psychological factors and determine whether these factors predicted rate and severity of total injury and concussion versus musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries.
Participants included male Bantam and Midget level ice hockey players (n=524).
Participants completed the BASC-II at baseline and post injury.
Injury records were completed by team designates during the hockey season during a period of six months.
The five main factors included in the regression model were sensation seeking, locus of control, anxiety, depression and attention problems.
The result suggested that together the five main factors could explain 10.7% of total injury occurrence and 12.0% of MSK injury occurrence.
The five main factors did not significantly predict concussion occurrence or injury severity.
Attention problems alone significantly predicted total injury and concussion occurrence and injury severity.
Locus of control and depression significantly predicted MSK injuries.
Knowledge of these psychological risk factors should guide psychosocial risk assessment and subsequent interventions. Dedications This thesis is first and foremost dedicated to my family.
Their unwavering and unconditional love and support, words of encouragement, compassion, and wisdom made my journey through graduate school possible. To my parents, I cannot begin to thank you enough for all you have done for me throughout my life.
You have al...





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