Execution of Diagnostic Testing Has a Stronger Effect on Emergency Department Crowding than Other Common Factors: A Cross-Sectional StudyReportar como inadecuado




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Study Objective

We compared the effects of execution of diagnostic tests in the emergency department ED and other common factors on the length of ED stay to identify those with the greatest impacts on ED crowding.

Methods

Between February 2010 and January 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional, single-center study in the ED of a large, urban, teaching hospital in Japan. Patients who visited the ED during the study period were enrolled. We excluded 1 patients scheduled for admission or pharmaceutical prescription, and 2 neonates requiring intensive care transferred from other hospitals. Multivariate linear regression was performed on log-transformed length of ED stay in admitted and discharged patients to compare influence of diagnostic tests and other common predictors. To quantify the range of change in length of ED stay given a unit change of the predictor, a generalized linear model was used for each group.

Results

During the study period, 55,285 patients were enrolled. In discharged patients, laboratory blood tests had the highest standardized β coefficient 0.44 among common predictors, and increased length of ED stay by 72.5 minutes 95% CI, 72.8–76.1 minutes. In admitted patients, computed tomography CT had the highest standardized β coefficient 0.17, and increased length of ED stay by 32.7 minutes 95% CI, 40.0–49.9 minutes. Although other common input and output factors were significant contributors, they had smaller standardized β coefficients in both groups.

Conclusions

Execution of laboratory blood tests and CT had a stronger influence on length of ED stay than other common input and output factors.



Autor: Takahisa Kawano , Kei Nishiyama, Hiroyuki Hayashi

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



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