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suburbia, colonial, Papaschase, Indian Reservation 163, Reserve, indigenous, Millwoods, Edmonton Alberta, Settler-Colonial, Postcolonial, neocolonial, spatialisation, spatialization

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Subject-Keyword: suburbia colonial Papaschase Indian Reservation 163 Reserve indigenous Millwoods Edmonton Alberta Settler-Colonial Postcolonial neocolonial spatialisation spatialization

Type of item: Report

Language: English

Place: Millwoods, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Time: 1870-2015

Description: he first suburb of Edmonton, the capital of the oil-rich western Canadian prairie province of Alberta, was arguably the Federal Government of Canada-s Papaschase Indian reservation 163. Situated inconveniently close to the settlement of Edmonton-Strathcona that had grown up around a Hudson-s Bay trading fort, the reservation was eliminated as its starving populace one-by-one -took scrip- in the mid-to-late 1800s, and accepted payment to cede their Aboriginal rights to reservation land. Almost a century later around 1970, parts of the area of the reservation of the Papaschase Cree became the site of an idealistic project to create an affordable suburb -Mill Woods-. This paper considers the respatialization of the former Indian Reservation, the -pentimento- or layers of Indigenous, colonial and modern occupancy of the land, and the current precarity and ethnic relations in the suburb of Mill Woods.

Date created: 2015

DOI: doi:10.7939-R33X83Z2W

License information: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International

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Autor: Shields, Rob Gillespie, Diane Moran, Kieran

Fuente: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Introducción



Edmonton, Amiskwaciy: Suburbs for Settlers Rob Shields, Dianne Gillespie, Kieran Moran City Region Studies Centre, Faculty of Extension University of Alberta (Nov.
2015) The first suburb of Edmonton, the capital of the oil-rich western Canadian prairie province of Alberta, was arguably an Indian reservation.
Situated inconveniently close to the settlement that had grown up around a Hudsons Bay trading fort, the reservation was eliminated as its starving populace one-by-one took scrip in the mid-to-late 1800s, and accepted payment to cede their Aboriginal rights to reservation land.1 Almost a century later around 1970, parts of the area of the reservation of the Papaschase Cree became the site of an idealistic project to create an affordable suburb, “Mill Woods”.
The way in which Edmonton is cast as a place and region or “spatialized”, is one in which this past is “flattened, shifted, reimagined, and elided in spectacular and spectral settler imaginaries” (Baloy 2015:19-21).
The effect is to render the aboriginal past barely present.
We explore the intersection of the social ideals of the 1960s and 1970s and the subsequent influx of migrants from all over the world with colonial oppressions that are an unacknowledged legacy of settler society. “Mill Woods will be a new urban community housing over 120,000 people, in its own right - a new city in a suburban environment” proclaimed the Edmonton City Planning Department (City of Edmonton, 1971:1).
No doubt Edmonton’s Chief Commissioner P.F. Bargen and the Executive Director of the Alberta Housing Commission, B.R.
Orysiuk were proud of their plans for this new suburb.
An ambitious development to encompass over 6000 acres, Mill Woods began as a publicly sponsored land assembly initiated in 1969, the first of its kind in North America (See Fig.
1). Canada is a suburban country.
More than two-thirds of Canadians now live in suburbs and a full 98% of growth in Edmonton between 2006 and 2011 occurred in s...





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