Genetic Correlations among Canine Hip Dysplasia Radiographic Traits in a Cohort of Australian German Shepherd Dogs, and Implications for the Design of a More Effective Genetic Control ProgramReportar como inadecuado




Genetic Correlations among Canine Hip Dysplasia Radiographic Traits in a Cohort of Australian German Shepherd Dogs, and Implications for the Design of a More Effective Genetic Control Program - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Canine hip dysplasia CHD is a common musculoskeletal disease in pedigree dog populations. It can cause severe pain and dysfunction which may require extensive medication and-or surgical treatment and often ultimately requires humane euthanasia. CHD has been found to be moderately heritable and, given its impact on welfare, should be considered an imperative breeding priority. The British Veterinary Association-Kennel Club scoring method is one of several measures used to assess the genetic propensity of potential breeding stock for dysplastic changes to the hips based on radiographic examination. It is a complex measure composed of nine ordinal traits, intended to evaluate both early and late dysplastic changes. It would be highly desirable if estimated breeding values EBVs for these nine traits were consolidated into a simpler, EBV-based, selection index more easily usable by breeders. A multivariate analysis on the phenotype scores from an Australian cohort of 13,124 German Shepherd Dogs GSDs returned genetic correlations between 0.48–0.97 for the nine traits which fell into two trait groups, Group 1 reflecting early changes -laxity- and Group 2 reflecting late changes -osteoarthritis-. Principal components analysis of the ordinal EBVs suggested the same pattern, with strong differentiation between -laxity- and -osteoarthritis- traits in the second component. Taking account of all results, we recommend interim use of two selection indexes: the first being the average of ordinal EBVs for -laxity- traits and the second being the average of ordinal EBVs for -osteoarthritis- traits. The correlation between these two selection indexes 0.771–0.774 is sufficiently less than unity enabling the selection of dogs with different genetic propensity for laxity and for osteoarthritic CHD changes in GSDs; this may also be applicable in other breeds. Dogs with low propensity for severe osteoarthritic change in the presence of laxity may be of interest both in molecular research and breeding programs.



Autor: Bethany J. Wilson , Frank W. Nicholas, John W. James, Claire M. Wade, Herman W. Raadsma, Peter C. Thomson

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



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