Changing Male Preferences for Female Body Type in the US: An Adaptive Response to a Changing Socioeconomic ClimateReportar como inadecuado




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The debate over changing ideals of beauty in Western society remains unresolved more than 20 years after Singh’s 1993 seminal study 1 suggesting there was a universal male preference for a female body shape with a low waist to hip ratio circa 0.7, which relates to maximum fecundity. Subsequent research has supported this universal preference while other studies have found that male preferences may be context dependent and capable of calibrating in response to the specific selection pressures of differing socio-ecologies. The current paper aims to help resolve this uncertainty with an analysis of body measurements of female models who were Playboy centrefolds from 1953-2014. Height is shown to increase significantly over time beyond a level that could be attributed to a positive secular trend. Along with a significant increase in waist to hip ratio WHR i.e. more tubular and a significant decrease in Body Mass Index BMI, these results represent a shift in male preferences away from signals of maximum fecundity, and towards a more androgenic female body shape. Contemporary research indicates that increasing height in women is positively associated with career orientation and negatively with reproduction ambition, thus the change in Western male preferences may be interpreted as an adaptive response to ecological conditions where a smaller family size and greater involvement of female partners in resource acquisition is adaptive.

KEYWORDS

Female Body Shape, Male Preferences, Behavioural Science

Cite this paper

Deady, D. and Smith, M. 2015 Changing Male Preferences for Female Body Type in the US: An Adaptive Response to a Changing Socioeconomic Climate. Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science, 5, 570-577. doi: 10.4236-jbbs.2015.513054.





Autor: Denis K. Deady, Miriam J. Law Smith*

Fuente: http://www.scirp.org/



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