Effect of the Deletion of Genes Encoding Proteins of the Extracellular Virion Form of Vaccinia Virus on Vaccine Immunogenicity and Protective Effectiveness in the Mouse ModelReportar como inadecuado




Effect of the Deletion of Genes Encoding Proteins of the Extracellular Virion Form of Vaccinia Virus on Vaccine Immunogenicity and Protective Effectiveness in the Mouse Model - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Antibodies to both infectious forms of vaccinia virus, the mature virion MV and the enveloped virion EV, as well as cell-mediated immune response appear to be important for protection against smallpox. EV virus particles, although more labile and less numerous than MV, are important for dissemination and spread of virus in infected hosts and thus important in virus pathogenesis. The importance of the EV A33 and B5 proteins for vaccine induced immunity and protection in a murine intranasal challenge model was evaluated by deletion of both the A33R and B5R genes in a vaccine-derived strain of vaccinia virus. Deletion of either A33R or B5R resulted in viruses with a small plaque phenotype and reduced virus yields, as reported previously, whereas deletion of both EV protein-encoding genes resulted in a virus that formed small infection foci that were detectable and quantifiable only by immunostaining and an even more dramatic decrease in total virus yield in cell culture. Deletion of B5R, either as a single gene knockout or in the double EV gene knockout virus, resulted in a loss of EV neutralizing activity, but all EV gene knockout viruses still induced a robust neutralizing activity against the vaccinia MV form of the virus. The effect of elimination of A33 and-or B5 on the protection afforded by vaccination was evaluated by intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of either vaccinia virus WR or IHD-J, a strain of vaccinia virus that produces relatively higher amounts of EV virus. The results from multiple experiments, using a range of vaccination doses and virus challenge doses, and using mortality, morbidity, and virus dissemination as endpoints, indicate that the absence of A33 and B5 have little effect on the ability of a vaccinia vaccine virus to provide protection against a lethal intranasal challenge in a mouse model.



Autor: Clement A. Meseda , Joseph Campbell, Arunima Kumar, Alonzo D. Garcia, Michael Merchlinsky, Jerry P. Weir

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



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