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TheIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC, established by the UnitedNations and World Meteorological Organization, has determined that humans havevery likely influenced a net warming to the Earth from the increase ofgreenhouse gases, aerosols and land use changes. This warming has caused theamount of ice on the Earth to continue to decrease and sea levels to rise. Inaddition, extreme precipitation events are happening more often in selectedregions of the world. A case study that assesses the impacts of, andadaptations to, these changes in climate is presented here. Two modeling programs,Sim CLIM and Train CLIM, CLIM Systems, Hamilton, New Zealand were used tosupport assessments for water supply, coastal zones and tropical cyclones in afictitious island group in the South Pacific region. In the case study, aconsulting group was -hired- to carry out these assessments. A final analysisand synthesis report were created to help the Ministry of the Environment ofthe made-up nation decide how to improve the governmental actions to addressthe real concerns posed by changing climate and sea level. Although a simulatedisland group is used in this article, there are sincere concerns about climatechange and extreme weather events in this part of the world. It is important toaddress the real and dangerous threat that these islands and people face in thewake of a changing climate and a growing global society.

KEYWORDS

Climate Change, Case Study, Water Supply, Coastal Zone Erosion, Tropical Cyclones

Cite this paper

Cannon, A. , Lalor, P. , Sriharan, S. , Fan, C. and Ozbay, G. 2014 A Case Study on Climate Change Response and Adaptation: Fictional Aysese Islands in the South Pacific. American Journal of Climate Change, 3, 455-473. doi: 10.4236-ajcc.2014.35040.





Autor: Amy Cannon1, Peter Lalor2, Shobha Sriharan3, Chunlei Fan4, Gulnihal Ozbay1*

Fuente: http://www.scirp.org/



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