Growth of Circulating Tumor Cell-Derived Colonies from Peripheral Blood of Melanoma Patients: Preliminary Characterization of Colony CompositionReportar como inadecuado




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Circulating tumor cells CTC are rarely detected in the blood of cancer patients, even though they are a direct harbinger of eventual patient demise. We developed an innovative CTC culture technology to allow more sensitive isolation, expansion, and characterization of viable colonies from patient blood. In this assay, the entire leukocyte fraction from 10 ml of anticoagulated patient blood is placed into culture medium without any pre-selection. After 16 days in culture, CTC derived colonies are counted. As a proof-of-principle, blood samples from 58 Stage IIa-IV melanoma patients were tested. Ninety percent of these samples grew colonies. The colony numbers ranged from 0 - 308 mean 63 ± 9.5 SEM. Ten normal volunteers had virtually no growth mean 0.5 ± 1.4 colonies. Colonies were harvested using a micropipette for characterization. Tumor-cell containing spheroids were embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and stained with melanoma-specific mAb for histologic characterization. MITF proved to be the most consistent immunostain that identified melanoma cells in these colonies. A host-cell component in colonies was also identified using CD68 and CD43 mAb staining. Following enzymatic dissociation of colonies, a variety of immunostains were tested. Papanicolau staining proved most useful for identifying the abnormal nuclei of tumor cells. Flow cytometry could readily distinguish host and tumor cell populations based on DNA content and forward-side scatter in dissociated colonies. The stem cell marker ALDH1A1 associated with the aneuploid population, but CD45 was expressed on both diploid and aneuploid cells. The ability to repeatedly isolate CTC derived colonies from cancer patient blood samples opens the door to a novel type of long-term clinical monitoring. This novel CTC culture technology may prove useful to perform molecular characterization, assessment of treatment response, and testing of drug sensitivity and resistance in patients during treatment.

KEYWORDS

Circulating Tumor Cells, CTC Colonies, CTC Cultures, Melanoma, Flow Cytometry, CTC Derived Colonies

Cite this paper

Samlowski, W. , McGregor, J. , Samlowski, S. , Tharkar, S. , Shen, S. and Bentz, J. 2014 Growth of Circulating Tumor Cell-Derived Colonies from Peripheral Blood of Melanoma Patients: Preliminary Characterization of Colony Composition. Health, 6, 1467-1481. doi: 10.4236-health.2014.612181.





Autor: Wolfram E. Samlowski, John R. McGregor, Suzanne T. Samlowski, Shweta Tharkar, Shirley Shen, Joel S. Bentz

Fuente: http://www.scirp.org/



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