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The reactive oxygen species ROS originated from endogenous and exogenous sources play a dominant role in the initiation and propagation of several diseases. It is therefore an urgent need to explore substances capable of encountering the ROS and resist the damage caused by ROS. The present paper deals with various aspects of generation and implications of ROS in the management of myocardial infarction. The use of biosynthetic amphiphilic biodegradable hydrogels in the control and management of ROS in myocardial infarction was studied using a biosynthetic hydrogel PA-PEGDA comprising polypropylene fumarate-co-alginate copolymer cross-linked with calcium and polyethylene glycol diacrylate PEGDA. The effect of ROS on the cell growth was studied using H2O2 as model ROS molecule. The present hydrogel resists the penetration of ROS in the cell which was evident from the live-dead assay, increased intra cellular GSH levels when compared with the H2O2 treated positive and curcumin treated negative control cells. The Comet assay reveals genomic integrity of the cells exposed to the present hydrogel. The hydrogel is a promising injectable material for the management of myocardial infarction and ischemia. 

KEYWORDS

Biosynthetic Hydrogels; Alginate; Polypropylene Fumarate; Reactive Oxygen Species; Control and Management; Myocardial Applications

Cite this paper

Thankam Finosh, G. and Jayabalan, M. 2013 Reactive oxygen species—Control and management using amphiphilic biosynthetic hydrogels for cardiac applications. Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, 4, 1134-1146. doi: 10.4236-abb.2013.412150.





Autor: Gnanaprakasam Thankam Finosh, Muthu Jayabalan

Fuente: http://www.scirp.org/



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