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With a portion of healthcarereimbursement now dependent on the patient’s report of the hospital experience,healthcare systems are looking for ways to improve patient satisfaction scores.In this study, one inpatient physiatrist at an acute inpatient rehabilitationfacility wore a button on the right lapel of his white coat at all times whichread -Ask ME about your TREATMENT and PROGRESS!!!- in order to determine if awearable visual cue prompting the patient to discuss his or her treatment andprogress alters Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey PGPSS scores. Meanscore on the physician-specific PGPSS question -How well the rehabilitationdoctor kept you informed about your treatment and progress- was calculatedretrospectively for five months before and after the physiatrist donned thebutton. Comparisons were made to two other inpatient physiatrists. For the button-wearing physiatrist, mean score for the physician-specific patientsatisfaction survey question for the five months before donning the button was88.1 ± 11.5; and, for the five months after donning the button, the mean scorewas 95.8 ± 5.9. These scores were marginally statistically different p = 0.07. Conversely, the differencein mean scores over the same time periods for two other inpatientphysiatrists who did not wear the button did not approach statistical significance.In conclusion, a wearable visual cue improved the PGPSS score specific to thequestion the visual cue addressed.

KEYWORDS

Press Ganey; Patient Satisfaction; Satisfaction Scores

Cite this paper

Pellicane, AJ. 2013 The effect of a wearable visual cue on patient satisfaction survey scores in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Health, 5, 6-8. doi: 10.4236-health.2013.56A2002.





Autor: Anthony J. Pellicane

Fuente: http://www.scirp.org/



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