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Patricia Harms ;Revista Signos 2010, 43 1

Autor: David Russell

Fuente: http://www.redalyc.org/


Introducción



Revista Signos ISSN: 0035-0451 revista.signos@ucv.cl Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Chile Russell, David; Harms, Patricia Genre, media, and communicating to learn in the disciplines: Vygotsky developmental theory and North American genre theory Revista Signos, vol.
43, núm.
1, 2010, pp.
227-248 Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Valparaíso, Chile Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=157021642013 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative 227 Revista Signos 2010 - 43 Número Especial Monográfico Nº 1 227-248 Genre, media, and communicating to learn in the disciplines: Vygotsky developmental theory and North American genre theory David Russell Patricia Harms Iowa State University University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Estados Unidos Estados Unidos Abstract: What is the relationship between medium and genre in learning and development? North American genre theory suggests following Miller (1984, 1994) that genre is social action.
Genres evoke expectations, direct attention, guide action and suggest ‘what motives we may have.’ Yet the relationship between media and genres, as Miller suggested at SIGET IV (1997), is complex.
The blog, for example, quickly evolved from being one genre to many genres and, today, might be said to be a medium more than a genre.
Bazerman at SIGET IV (2007) argued, following Vygotsky (1997), that genres −particularly written genres− ‘provide highly differentiated, scaffolded communicative spaces in which we learn the cognitive practices of specialized domains.’ This paper provides some evidence for Bazerman’s theory from a case study of students in engineering.
It shows how genres may scaffold development by directing attent...





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