Phenotype Fingerprinting Suggests the Involvement of Single-Genotype Consortia in Degradation of Aromatic Compounds by Rhodopseudomonas palustrisReportar como inadecuado




Phenotype Fingerprinting Suggests the Involvement of Single-Genotype Consortia in Degradation of Aromatic Compounds by Rhodopseudomonas palustris - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Anaerobic degradation of complex organic compounds by microorganisms is crucial for development of innovative biotechnologies for bioethanol production and for efficient degradation of environmental pollutants. In natural environments, the degradation is usually accomplished by syntrophic consortia comprised of different bacterial species. This strategy allows consortium organisms to reduce efforts required for maintenance of the redox homeostasis at each syntrophic level. Cellular mechanisms that maintain the redox homeostasis during the degradation of aromatic compounds by one organism are not fully understood. Here we present a hypothesis that the metabolically versatile phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris forms its own syntrophic consortia, when it grows anaerobically on p-coumarate or benzoate as a sole carbon source. We have revealed the consortia from large-scale measurements of mRNA and protein expressions under p-coumarate, benzoate and succinate degrading conditions using a novel computational approach referred as phenotype fingerprinting. In this approach, marker genes for known R. palustris phenotypes are employed to determine the relative expression levels of genes and proteins in aromatics versus non-aromatics degrading condition. Subpopulations of the consortia are inferred from the expression of phenotypes and known metabolic modes of the R. palustris growth. We find that p-coumarate degrading conditions may lead to at least three R. palustris subpopulations utilizing p-coumarate, benzoate, and CO2 and H2. Benzoate degrading conditions may also produce at least three subpopulations utilizing benzoate, CO2 and H2, and N2 and formate. Communication among syntrophs and inter-syntrophic dynamics in each consortium are indicated by up-regulation of transporters and genes involved in the curli formation and chemotaxis. The N2-fixing subpopulation in the benzoate degrading consortium has preferential activation of the vanadium nitrogenase over the molybdenum nitrogenase. This subpopulation in the consortium was confirmed in an independent experiment by consumption of dissolved nitrogen gas under the benzoate degrading conditions.



Autor: Tatiana V. Karpinets , Dale A. Pelletier, Chongle Pan, Edward C. Uberbacher, Galina V. Melnichenko, Robert L. Hettich, Nagiza F.

Fuente: http://plos.srce.hr/



DESCARGAR PDF




Documentos relacionados