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1

Flathead Animal Clinic, 344 1st Ave. W., Kalispell, MT 59901, USA

2

Friendship Hospital for Animals, 4105 Brandywine St. NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA

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Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, A-312 Earth & Marine Sciences Building Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA

4

Marine Wildlife Veterinary Care and Research Center, Department of Fish and Game, Office of Spill Prevention and Response, 1451 Shaffer Rd, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

5

Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, CA 93940, USA





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Abstract A two and a half year old spayed female Miniature Australian Shepherd presented to a Montana veterinary clinic with acute onset of anorexia, vomiting and depression. Two days prior, the dog was exposed to an algal bloom in a community lake. Within h, the animal became lethargic and anorexic, and progressed to severe depression and vomiting. A complete blood count and serum chemistry panel suggested acute hepatitis, and a severe coagulopathy was noted clinically. Feces from the affected dog were positive for the cyanobacterial biotoxin, microcystin-LA 217 ppb. The dog was hospitalized for eight days. Supportive therapy consisted of fluids, mucosal protectants, vitamins, antibiotics, and nutritional supplements. On day five of hospitalization, a bile acid sequestrant, cholestyramine, was administered orally. Rapid clinical improvement was noted within 48 h of initiating oral cholestyramine therapy. At 17 days post-exposure the dog was clinically normal, and remained clinically normal at re-check, one year post-exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of canine cyanobacterial microcystin toxicosis. Untreated microcystin intoxication is commonly fatal, and can result in significant liver damage in surviving animals. The clinical success of this case suggests that oral administration of cholestyramine, in combination with supportive therapy, could significantly reduce hospitalization time, cost-of-care and mortality for microcystin-poisoned animals View Full-Text

Keywords: acute hepatitis; blue-green algae; cholestyramine; cyanobacteria; hepatotoxin; microsystin; poisoning; silibinin acute hepatitis; blue-green algae; cholestyramine; cyanobacteria; hepatotoxin; microsystin; poisoning; silibinin





Autor: Kelly A. Rankin 1, Karen A. Alroy 2, Raphael M. Kudela 3, Stori C. Oates 4, Michael J. Murray 5 and Melissa A. Miller 4,*

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



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