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1

Neuroscience Program, Drake University, Des Moines, IA 50311, USA

2

Biology Department, Drake University, Des Moines, IA 50311, USA





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Abstract Few studies have examined the role of shoe height in the context of American football cleats. Eighteen adult males 28.4 ± 1.9 years, 182.3 ± 0.6 cm, 75.7 ± 1.6 kg performed four football drills 60-yd dash, 54-yd cutting drill, 5-10-5 drill pro agility drill, and ladder jumping drill in low-top, mid-top, and high-top American football cleats. Drill-specific performance outcomes were measured after each drill, and the subjects’ ankle range-of-motion dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, eversion, inversion and perception of the footwear comfort, heaviness, stability were assessed before and after each drill sequence. Performance outcomes were not influenced by shoe height. The high-top cleat limited dorsiflexion and inversion, but not plantarflexion or eversion, compared to low-top and mid-top cleats. Athletes rated the high-top cleats as less comfortable and heavier than either the low-top or mid-top cleats, but perceived the mid-top and high-top cleats to be equally stable to each other, and both more stable than the low-top cleats. Range-of-motion and performance scores did not change as a result of acute exercise. These findings suggest that high-top cleats may limit ankle motions associated with injury without deleteriously influencing performance, though athletes may not perceive the high-top cleats as favorably as low- or mid-top cleats. View Full-Text

Keywords: agility; American football; cutting; drills; footwear; goniometry; range-of-motion; shoes; speed; sprinting agility; American football; cutting; drills; footwear; goniometry; range-of-motion; shoes; speed; sprinting





Autor: Calvin W. Daack 1 and David S. Senchina 2,*

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



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