Tailoring Hydrogel Viscoelasticity with Physical and Chemical CrosslinkingReportar como inadecuado




Tailoring Hydrogel Viscoelasticity with Physical and Chemical Crosslinking - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

1

Injury Prevention and Trauma Management Theme, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, Queensland 4059, Australia

2

School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Academic Editor: Esmaiel Jabbari

Abstract Biological tissues are viscoelastic, demonstrating a mixture of fluid and solid responses to mechanical strain. Whilst viscoelasticity is critical for native tissue function, it is rarely used as a design criterion in biomaterials science or tissue engineering. We propose that viscoelasticity may be tailored to specific levels through manipulation of the hydrogel type, or more specifically the proportion of physical and chemical crosslinks present in a construct. This theory was assessed by comparing the mechanical properties of various hydrogel blends, comprising elastic, equilibrium, storage and loss moduli, as well as the loss tangent. These properties were also assessed in human articular cartilage explants. It was found that whilst very low in elastic modulus, the physical crosslinks found in gellan gum-only provided the closest approximation of loss tangent levels found in cartilage. Blends of physical and chemical crosslinks gelatin methacrylamide GelMA combined with gellan gum gave highest values for elastic response. However, a greater proportion of gellan gum to GelMA than investigated may be required to achieve native cartilage viscoelasticity in this case. Human articular chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogels remained viable over one week of culture. Overall, it was shown that viscoelasticity may be tailored similarly to other mechanical properties and may prove a new criterion to be included in the design of biomaterial structures for tissue engineering. View Full-Text

Keywords: viscoelasticity; hydrogel; gelatin; materials characterization viscoelasticity; hydrogel; gelatin; materials characterization





Autor: Michal Bartnikowski 1, R Mark Wellard 1,2, Maria Woodruff 1 and Travis Klein 1,*

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



DESCARGAR PDF




Documentos relacionados