Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Enhances High Intensity Time Trial Performance Following Prolonged CyclingReportar como inadecuado


Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Enhances High Intensity Time Trial Performance Following Prolonged Cycling


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Human Performance Lab, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, USA





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Abstract There is good evidence that mouth rinsing with carbohydrate CHO solutions can enhance endurance performance ≥30 min. The impact of a CHO mouth rinse on sprint performance has been less consistent, suggesting that CHO may confer benefits in conditions of ‘metabolic strain’. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the impact of late-exercise mouth rinsing on sprint performance. Secondly, we investigated the effects of a protein mouth rinse PRO on performance. Eight trained male cyclists participated in three trials consisting of 120 min of constant-load cycling 55% Wmax followed by a 30 km computer-simulated time trial, during which only water was provided. Following 15 min of muscle function assessment, 10 min of constant-load cycling 3 min at 35% Wmax, 7 min at 55% Wmax was performed. This was immediately followed by a 2 km time trial. Subjects rinsed with 25 mL of CHO, PRO, or placebo PLA at min 5:00 and 14:30 of the 15 min muscle function phase, and min 8:00 of the 10-min constant-load cycling. Magnitude-based inferential statistics were used to analyze the effects of the mouth rinse on 2-km time trial performance and the following physiological parameters: Maximum Voluntary Contract MVC, Rating of Perceived Exertion RPE, Heart Rate HR, and blood glucose levels. The primary finding was that CHO ‘likely’ enhanced performance vs. PLA 3.8%, whereas differences between PRO and PLA were unclear 0.4%. These data demonstrate that late-race performance is enhanced by a CHO rinse, but not PRO, under challenging metabolic conditions. More data should be acquired before this strategy is recommended for the later stages of cycling competition under more practical conditions, such as when carbohydrates are supplemented throughout the preceding minutes-hours of exercise. View Full-Text

Keywords: cycling; endurance performance; maltodextrin; mouth wash; oralpharyngeal receptor; whey protein cycling; endurance performance; maltodextrin; mouth wash; oralpharyngeal receptor; whey protein





Autor: Nicholas D. Luden * , Michael J. Saunders, Andrew C. D’Lugos, Mark W. Pataky, Daniel A. Baur, Caitlin B. Vining and Adam B. Schroer

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



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