On the Emerging Role of the Taste Receptor Type 1 T1R Family of Nutrient-Sensors in the Musculoskeletal SystemReportar como inadecuado


On the Emerging Role of the Taste Receptor Type 1 T1R Family of Nutrient-Sensors in the Musculoskeletal System


On the Emerging Role of the Taste Receptor Type 1 T1R Family of Nutrient-Sensors in the Musculoskeletal System - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

1

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-machi, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495, Japan

2

Division of Molecular Signaling and Biochemistry, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580, Japan

3

Division of Biomedical Science, Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine, 3200 Cold Spring Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46222, USA

4

Bone and Mineral Research Group, Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine, 3200 Cold Spring Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46222, USA

5

Division of Anatomy, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580, Japan





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Academic Editor: Yung Hou Wong

Abstract The special sense of taste guides and guards food intake and is essential for body maintenance. Salty and sour tastes are sensed via ion channels or gated ion channels while G protein-coupled receptors GPCRs of the taste receptor type 1 T1R family sense sweet and umami tastes and GPCRs of the taste receptor type 2 T2R family sense bitter tastes. T1R and T2R receptors share similar downstream signaling pathways that result in the stimulation of phospholipase-C-β2. The T1R family includes three members that form heterodimeric complexes to recognize either amino acids or sweet molecules such as glucose. Although these functions were originally described in gustatory tissue, T1R family members are expressed in numerous non-gustatory tissues and are now viewed as nutrient sensors that play important roles in monitoring global glucose and amino acid status. Here, we highlight emerging evidence detailing the function of T1R family members in the musculoskeletal system and review these findings in the context of the musculoskeletal diseases sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which are major public health problems among the elderly that affect locomotion, activities of daily living, and quality of life. These studies raise the possibility that T1R family member function may be modulated for therapeutic benefit. View Full-Text

Keywords: taste receptor; bone; skeletal muscle; sarcopenia; osteoporosis; T1R3; myogenesis; bone remodeling taste receptor; bone; skeletal muscle; sarcopenia; osteoporosis; T1R3; myogenesis; bone remodeling





Autor: Shoichiro Kokabu 1,2,* , Jonathan W. Lowery 3,4, Takashi Toyono 5, Tsuyoshi Sato 1 and Tetsuya Yoda 1

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



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