Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer MaterialsReportar como inadecuado


Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials


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1

Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050, China

2

Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

3

Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

4

Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

5

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA



These two authors contributed equally.





*

Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Academic Editor: Marco Salerno

Abstract A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: 1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and 2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1-10 that of control composites p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries. View Full-Text

Keywords: protein repellant; dental composite; human saliva microcosm biofilm; amalgam; glass ionomer; caries inhibition protein repellant; dental composite; human saliva microcosm biofilm; amalgam; glass ionomer; caries inhibition





Autor: Ning Zhang 1,2,†, Mary A.S. Melo 2,†, Michael D. Weir 2, Mark A. Reynolds 2, Yuxing Bai 1,* and Hockin H.K. Xu 2,3,4,5,*

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



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