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Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, the University of Texas at Austin, 301 E. Dean Keeton St., Austin, TX 78712, USA

2

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room E19-370L, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Academic Editor: Jennie C. Stephens

Abstract The two major pathways for energy utilization from biomass are conversion to a liquid fuel i.e., biofuels or conversion to electricity i.e., biopower. In the United States US, biomass policy has focused on biofuels. However, this paper will investigate three options for biopower: low co-firing co-firing scenarios refer to combusting a given percentage of biomass with coal 5%–10% biomass, medium co-firing 15%–20% biomass, and dedicated biomass firing 100% biomass. We analyze the economic and greenhouse gas GHG emissions impact of each of these options, with and without CO2 capture and storage CCS. Our analysis shows that in the absence of land use change emissions, all biomass co-combustion scenarios result in a decrease in GHG emissions over coal generation alone. The two biggest barriers to biopower are concerns about carbon neutrality of biomass fuels and the high cost compared to today’s electricity prices. This paper recommends two policy actions. First, the need to define sustainability criteria and initiate a certification process so that biomass providers have a fixed set of guidelines to determine whether their feedstocks qualify as renewable energy sources. Second, the need for a consistent, predictable policy that provides the economic incentives to make biopower economically attractive. View Full-Text

Keywords: biomass; CCS; renewable energy; bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration BECCS; negative emissions; co-firing biomass; CCS; renewable energy; bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration BECCS; negative emissions; co-firing





Autor: Amanda D. Cuellar 1 and Howard Herzog 2,*

Fuente: http://mdpi.com/



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