Vol 14: Why down under is a cut above: a comparison of rates of and reasons for caesarean section in England and Australia.Reportar como inadecuado



 Vol 14: Why down under is a cut above: a comparison of rates of and reasons for caesarean section in England and Australia.


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This article is from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, volume 14.AbstractBackground: Most studies examining determinants of rising rates of caesarean section have examined patterns in documented reasons for caesarean over time in a single location. Further insights could be gleaned from cross-cultural research that examines practice patterns in locations with disparate rates of caesarean section at a single time point. Methods: We compared both rates of and main reason for pre-labour and intrapartum caesarean between England and Queensland, Australia, using data from retrospective cross-sectional surveys of women who had recently given birth in England n = 5,250 and Queensland n = 3,467. Results: Women in Queensland were more likely to have had a caesarean birth 36.2% than women in England 25.1% of births; OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.28-1.61, after adjustment for obstetric characteristics. Between-country differences were found for rates of pre-labour caesarean 21.2% vs. 12.2% but not for intrapartum caesarean or assisted vaginal birth. Compared to women in England, women in Queensland with a history of caesarean were more likely to have had a pre-labour caesarean and more likely to have had an intrapartum caesarean, due only to a previous caesarean. Among women with no previous caesarean, Queensland women were more likely than women in England to have had a caesarean due to suspected disproportion and failure to progress in labour. Conclusions: The higher rates of caesarean birth in Queensland are largely attributable to higher rates of caesarean for women with a previous caesarean, and for the main reason of having had a previous caesarean. Variation between countries may be accounted for by the absence of a single, comprehensive clinical guideline for caesarean section in Queensland.



Autor: Prosser, Samantha J; Miller, Yvette D; Thompson, Rachel; Redshaw, Maggie

Fuente: https://archive.org/







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