Vol 3: Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees.Reportar como inadecuado



 Vol 3: Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees.


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This article is from Biology Open, volume 3.AbstractRoyal jelly proteins MRJPs of the honeybee bear several open questions. One of them is their expression in tissues other than the hypopharyngeal glands HGs, the site of royal jelly production. The sole MRJP-like gene of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris BtRJPL, represents a pre-diversification stage of the MRJP gene evolution in bees. Here we investigate the expression of BtRJPL in the HGs and the brain of bumblebees. Comparison of the HGs of bumblebees and honeybees revealed striking differences in their morphology with respect to sex- and caste-specific appearance, number of cells per acinus, and filamentous actin F-actin rings. At the cellular level, we found a temporary F-actin-covered meshwork in the secretory cells, which suggests a role for actin in the biogenesis of the end apparatus in HGs. Using immunohistochemical localization, we show that BtRJPL is expressed in the bumblebee brain, predominantly in the Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, the site of sensory integration in insects, and in the optic lobes. Our data suggest that a dual gland-brain function preceded the multiplication of MRJPs in the honeybee lineage. In the course of the honeybee evolution, HGs dramatically changed their morphology in order to serve a food-producing function.



Autor: Albert, Stefan; Spaethe, Johannes; Grubel, Kornelia; Rossler, Wolfgang

Fuente: https://archive.org/



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