Vol 5: PTEN regulates AMPA receptor-mediated cell viability in iPS-derived motor neurons.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 5: PTEN regulates AMPA receptor-mediated cell viability in iPS-derived motor neurons.


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This article is from Cell Death & Disease, volume 5.AbstractExcitatory transmission in the brain is commonly mediated by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid AMPA receptors. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ALS, AMPA receptors allow cytotoxic levels of calcium into neurons, contributing to motor neuron injury. We have previously shown that oculomotor neurons resistant to the disease process in ALS show reduced AMPA-mediated inward calcium currents compared with vulnerable spinal motor neurons. We have also shown that PTEN phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 knockdown via siRNA promotes motor neuron survival in models of spinal muscular atrophy SMA and ALS. It has been reported that inhibition of PTEN attenuates the death of hippocampal neurons post injury by decreasing the effective translocation of the GluR2 subunit into the membrane. In addition, leptin can regulate AMPA receptor trafficking via PTEN inhibition. Thus, we speculate that manipulation of AMPA receptors by PTEN may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for neuroprotective intervention in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. To this end, the first step is to establish a fibroblast–iPS–motor neuron in vitro cell model to study AMPA receptor manipulation. Here we report that iPS-derived motor neurons from human fibroblasts express AMPA receptors. PTEN depletion decreases AMPA receptor expression and AMPA-mediated whole-cell currents, resulting in inhibition of AMPA-induced neuronal death in primary cultured and iPS-derived motor neurons. Taken together, our results imply that PTEN depletion may protect motor neurons by inhibition of excitatory transmission that represents a therapeutic strategy of potential benefit for the amelioration of excitotoxicity in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders.



Author: Yang, D-J; Wang, X-L; Ismail, A; Ashman, C J; Valori, C F; Wang, G; Gao, S; Higginbottom, A; Ince, P G; Azzouz, M; Xu, J; Shaw, P J; Ning, K

Source: https://archive.org/







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