Vol 14: Preventive health care among HIV positive women in a Utah HIV-AIDS clinic: a retrospective cohort study.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 14: Preventive health care among HIV positive women in a Utah HIV-AIDS clinic: a retrospective cohort study.


Vol 14: Preventive health care among HIV positive women in a Utah HIV-AIDS clinic: a retrospective cohort study. - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Download or read this book online for free in PDF: Vol 14: Preventive health care among HIV positive women in a Utah HIV-AIDS clinic: a retrospective cohort study.
This article is from BMC Womens Health, volume 14.AbstractBackground: Despite evidence that HIV positive women may suffer higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, human papillomavirus infection, and some types of cancer, the provision of preventive health services to HIV positive women is unknown. Preventive health services recommended for such women include breast, colorectal and cervical cancer screening, sexually transmitted infection STI testing, vaccinations, and patient counseling on a number of issues including sexual behaviors. Methods: This retrospective cohort study utilized medical record reviews of 192 HIV positive women who were patients at the University of Utah Infectious Diseases Clinic in 2009. Medical records were reviewed for all encounters during 2009 using a standardized data collection form; data were collected on patient demographics and a variety of preventive health services. Chi squared tests were used to assess receipt of preventive health services by demographic factors, and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of receiving select services. Results: The most commonly recorded preventive services included blood pressure screening, screening for Hepatitis A and B, Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis vaccination, Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination, substance abuse screening, and mental health screening. STI testing and safe sex counseling were documented in the medical records of only 37% and 33.9% of women, respectively. Documentation of cancer screening was also low, with cervical cancer screening documented for 56.8% of women, mammography for 65% Nā€‰=ā€‰26-40 of women, and colorectal cancer screening for 10% Nā€‰=ā€‰4-40 of women, where indicated. In multivariable models, women with private health insurance were less likely to have documented STI testing OR 0.20; 95% CI 0.08 - 0.52, and, Hispanic women were less likely to have documented safe-sex counseling OR 0.26; 95% CI 0.07 - 0.94. Conclusions: HIV-AIDS providers should focus on the needs of all women for preventive care services, including those with fewer socio-demographic risk factors i.e., insured, stable housing etc

In addition, failure to provide STI testing, cancer screening, or safe sex counseling to all patients represents a missed opportunity for provision of services that are important from both a clinical and public health perspective.



Author: Simonsen, Sara E; Kepka, Deanna; Thompson, Joan; Warner, Echo L; Snyder, Maggie; Ries, Kristen M

Source: https://archive.org/







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