Vol 8: Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients.Reportar como inadecuado



 Vol 8: Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients.


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This article is from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, volume 8.AbstractAmbulation or walking is one of the main gaits of locomotion. In terrestrial animals, it may be defined as a series of rhythmic and bilaterally coordinated movement of the limbs which creates a forward movement of the body. This applies regardless of the number of limbs—from arthropods with six or more limbs to bipedal primates. These fundamental similarities among species may explain why comparable neural systems and cellular properties have been found, thus far, to control in similar ways locomotor rhythm generation in most animal models. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the known structural and functional features associated with central nervous system CNS networks that are involved in the control of ambulation and other stereotyped motor patterns—specifically Central Pattern Generators CPGs that produce basic rhythmic patterned outputs for locomotion, micturition, ejaculation, and defecation. Although there is compelling evidence of their existence in humans, CPGs have been most studied in reduced models including in vitro isolated preparations, genetically-engineered mice and spinal cord-transected animals. Compared with other structures of the CNS, the spinal cord is generally considered as being well-preserved phylogenetically. As such, most animal models of spinal cord-injured SCI should be considered as valuable tools for the development of novel pharmacological strategies aimed at modulating spinal activity and restoring corresponding functions in chronic SCI patients.



Autor: Guertin, Pierre A.

Fuente: https://archive.org/



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