NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20160004943: 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence and Status Review For: the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft-Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular-Reportar como inadecuado



 NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20160004943: 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence and Status Review For: the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft-Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular-


NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20160004943: 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence and Status Review For: the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft-Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular- - Descarga este documento en PDF. Documentación en PDF para descargar gratis. Disponible también para leer online.

Descargar gratis o leer online en formato PDF el libro: NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20160004943: 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence and Status Review For: the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft-Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular-
The 2015 Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel from here on referred to as the SRP participated in a WebEx-teleconference with members of the Human Health Countermeasures HHC Element, representatives from the Human Research Program HRP, NASA Headquarters, and NASA Research and Education Support Services NRESS on December 17, 2015 list of participants is in Section VI of this report. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft-Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular-Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Spaceflight from here on referred to as the 2015 Sensorimotor Evidence Report, and also received a status review of the Risk. The opening section of the 2015 Sensorimotor Evidence Report provides written descriptions of various incidents that have occurred during space missions. In most of these incidents, the main underlying contributing factors are not easy to identify unambiguously. For example, in section 1.9, a number of falls occurred while astronauts were walking on the moon. It is not clear to the SRP, however, why they fell. It is only possible to extrapolate from likely specific psychophysical or physiological abnormalities, but how these abnormalities were determined, and how they were directly responsible for the falls is unclear to the SRP. Section 2.1.2 on proprioception is very interesting, but the functional significance of the abnormalities detected is not clear. The SRP sees this as a problem throughout the report: a mapping between the component abnormalities identified and the holistic behaviors that are most relevant, for example, controlling the vehicle, and locomotion during egress, is generally lacking. The SRP thinks the cognitive section is too strongly focused on vestibular functioning. The SRP questions the notion that the main cognitive effects are mainly attributable to reversible vestibular changes induced by spaceflight. The SRP thinks that there can also be independent cognitive effects. The Functional Task Test FTT protocols and the Field Test are particularly valuable. The conclusion is that the unloading of major postural muscles experienced during spaceflight plays a central role in the alteration of functional task performance and balance control. This conclusion stands in contrast with the statements in other parts of the document that emphasize the role of vestibular changes on these functions. It would help to more fully integrate these two views on the predominant effects of spaceflight. Although the SRP thinks the countermeasures section is interesting, the proposed countermeasures are not well integrated with the abnormalities described in previous sections. The SRP thinks it would help enormously to have explicit links among each abnormality, its 2015 Sensorimotor Risk SRP Evidence Review Final Report 2 overall importance-impact on function, and the appropriate countermeasure that can be implemented to maintain adequate functioning.



Autor: NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fuente: https://archive.org/







Documentos relacionados