NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20150022334: Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASAs Marshall Space Flight CenterReportar como inadecuado



 NASA Technical Reports Server NTRS 20150022334: Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center


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To successfully operate a photovoltaic PV array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry e.g. blocking diodes. Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their systems integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customers needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.



Autor: NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fuente: https://archive.org/







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