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Mauricio Barreto ; Monica Kramer ; Rita de C. Barradas Barata ;Revista de Saúde Pública 2007, 41 1

Autor: Laura Rodrigues

Fuente: http://www.redalyc.org/


Introducción



Revista de Saúde Pública ISSN: 0034-8910 revsp@usp.br Universidade de São Paulo Brasil Rodrigues, Laura; Barreto, Mauricio; Kramer, Monica; Barradas Barata, Rita de C. Resposta brasileira à tuberculose: contexto, desafios e perspectivas Revista de Saúde Pública, vol.
41, núm.
1, septiembre, 2007 Universidade de São Paulo São Paulo, Brasil Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=67240164001 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative Rev Saúde Pública 2007;41(Supl.
1):3 Editorial Laura Rodrigues Mauricio Barreto Monica Kramer Rita de C.
Barradas Barata Brazilian response to tuberculosis: context, challenges and perspectives Editors of the Supplement Tuberculosis (TB) has affected mankind for more than 8,000 years.
Before the mid-19th century TB was not recognized as a contagious disease and was attributable to several causes such as hereditary, miasmas, and other environmental and social determinants.
But, in 1882, Robert Koch identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which allowed to defining TB as an infectious disease.
Then blossoming biomedical research started its quest for vaccines and drug therapies.
BCG vaccine was applied for the first time in humans in 1921.
Years later, in 1944, streptomycin was successfully used in TB treatment and it was the starting point for a number of anti-TB drug therapies. These breakthroughs created new opportunities for TB prevention and treatment.
However, in the 19th century, TB mortality in Europe was remarkably higher than that seen in Africa today.
Yet a sharp decline in TB mortality was seen by the end of that century, long before the advent of modern preventive and therapeutic alternatives, most likely due to improved life conditions.
Today, in developed co...





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